Life in the 1960s

One of the side effects of the recent weather, has been the disappearance of many of our normal TV channels. We use a service called Freeview. It connects to the TV for free, once you have got the system in your TV set, or as in our case, via a PVR.

The aerial on our house is pointing out in the right direction, but has recently been affected by being overgrown by the branches of the oak tree at the front. So when it is windy, or raining heavily (almost every day) the signal breaks down, and we receive a message that there is ‘No Signal.’

Over the past few days, this problem has been exacerbated by wind and rain, once again. Tonight, we finally lost most channels completely, so I am ‘News Blind’, and most of the film channels have also disappeared too. This has created an interesting dilemma. Do we watch the poor output- basically crap – of the channels still available, or do we just forget that we have a TV? We can watch DVD films instead, or things that are left on the PVR. But as it approaches 10 PM, maybe we should chat, or do something like read a book?

I write a lot about the weather, as I am sure that you are aware. However, I think that this is the first time that it has affected TV reception so badly, that we have to consider the alternative of life without TV. It reminds me of the 1960s. Only two channels, poor reception, and little to watch in the late evening, unless you had a really strong signal. So much for embracing the ‘Modern Age.’ It doesn’t seem to be up to our expectations.

Then again, what is?

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26 thoughts on “Life in the 1960s

    1. Maybe when I have to replace the TV. Our current five year old LED 3-D Toshiba requires an add-on module for receiving an internet connection. Newer sets have them built in. I will have to get through all my unwatched DVD films first though!
      Cheers, Pete.

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  1. With 20 channels of Polish tras TV to watch, I don’t.
    Films and anything else worth watching can be downloaded, live streaming of UK and many worldwide TV stations is available via filmon.com and if I really want to I can get Sky streamed via some dodgy sites, great for live sporting events. So for me technology works great, even my internet is provided free by the council.
    In saying all that if I spend more than 5 hours a week in front on the screen then I’d be surprised, or ill.
    I probably spend more time at the computer.
    Mind you livening in this part of Poland you can sometimes think you are in the 60’s, which suites me just fine 🙂

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    1. I am a bit of a news addict, admittedly. Then I also watch films in the evenings. Mind you, I do probably spend more time at the computer- blogging!
      Cheers mate, Pete.

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  2. Here, we pay for the cable connection. I am not much into tv-watching so when we renewed our subscription, we just chose the available free channels and some channels with additional fees for each.

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    1. We haven’t had much problem with the reception before, Arlene, but the tree has got so big now, it is has become an issue. Cable TV is available, but it’s a very expensive option over here.
      Best wishes, Pete.

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  3. Ha, reminds me of explaining TV really used to closedown to my boys. And what a test card was. You have me longing for the days of sitcoms with the Thames or LWT logo coming on!

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  4. I can remember the days when we just had two channels too… Antenna on the roof, where grandpa had to climb a ladder to adjust it from time to time.. Until the invention of a little box that would do the antenna moving for you inside the comfort of your home. Oh what an invention he’d say..

    I hate ladders so I wasn’t very proud of myself for never offering to climb up the ladder to do it for him.. It’s the coming down I dislike with a passion… But, strangely I’d climb trees very high and hang from the bend in my knees upside down.. Oh my poor grandma would call out and say isn’t that long enough to be dangling from that limb?

    A number of years back there was a huge power outage in Canada and the Eastern part of the United States.. We were without power for 7 days(thankfully in the summer not winter) and it’s odd just how much reading and talking can be done without the luxuries of the modern world.. I cooked meals on the BBQ and we feasted on all of the stuff in the freezer, moving on to can food toward mid week.. I didn’t want to poison my family.. Those cans of pork and beans never tasted so good…

    Take care, Laura ~

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  5. I have to agree freeview reception is terrible in my part of Belfast but my telly broke down a few months back and apart from the news I don’t miss it. give me the radio or a good book any day

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    1. It just seems to be our house, Alan, and the fact that the oak trees have grown so close to the aerial during the four years we have been here. We have a plan to get them cut back, but have to get permission, as they are listed. I might just get the aerial moved instead. I agree that TV has become a habit, but there have been some excellent dramas on BBC over the last few years, and I would not want to have missed them.
      best wishes, Pete.

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    1. Got no BBC/ITV/C4 etc at all. I don’t mind that much, as I can get news online, but I prefer to watch News 24 on TV. I think it’s going to be an aerial job, but it always happens at weekends. Just as well I am not bothered about football or Wimbledon!
      Cheers, Pete.

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  6. We have a smart TV but are TV Luddites so can’t work it 😊. We record the programmes we like so we can fast forward through adverts, and watch them from 10-11pm. One night a week we listen to music, no TV. Movies we want come round eventually on Sky, so don’t bother with Netflix or Amazon, we like a simple life!

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    1. I am not that good with the TV setup either, FR. We don’t have Sky, and the telly is not connected to the Internet. I mainly watch news and documentaries, as well as films on TV. I could live without it, given some practice!
      Regards, Pete.

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  7. We like to watch baseball games, and that’s it as far as television is concerned for me. I have become infatuated with Neflix because I can order obscure movies and they come via the mail, and I stream on-line. I can see television shows and movies and only pay a small monthly fee. I would just assume watch a movie and read a book. Perfect daily entertaining.
    It’s my computer and the internet where I spend my hours of the day. When the Internet goes down, that’s when all hell breaks loose and I panic.
    Oh–I’ve started to watch movies via Amazon. I can rent any film I want for a few dollars immediately. I can watch them on my television or computer screen.

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    1. That might be the way forward, Cindy. I have to connect my TV to the Internet first, but there are lots of devices available to do that. I can get access to Amazon TV for about $100 a year. Netflix here is about $15 a month, but works across all devices.
      Or I can just get the tree branch cut down, or the aerial moved away from it. Time will tell.
      Best wishes, Pete.

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  8. I disconnected the cable TV a couple of years ago. I get all of my news online. I don’t miss TV in the least—except I do wish i could watch the new X-Files mini-series. Las Vegas got hit with quite a storm yesterday: rain, hail, thunder, lightning! We probably got a third of our annual precipitation in just a few short hours! Monsoon Season? Hail, yes!

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    1. I have that ‘last’ X-Files series recorded, and have watched 3/6. It is hit and miss, but when it’s good, it’s very good.I am coming around to the idea of no TV. But then again, I have others to consider. I may be getting the aerial moved next week…
      Best wishes, Pete.

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  9. Pete, I am fascinated by your weather as much as you are frustrated by it. Whether there is a climate change or not – and I think most know the answer to that – the fact is, our weather patterns are changing, and if we can do anything to mitigate their impact on our lives, how can that be bad? As California enters a decade of drought, it seems once again that “water is the new oil.” If you can bottle what you have coming down for free, there is money to be made getting it to us in LA!

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